Vacuum Application

Applied vacuum can normally be divided into three main categories:

Blowers or low vacuumIndustrial vacuumProcess vacuum
0–20 -kPa20–99 -kPa99 -kPa –
For ventilation, cooling, vacuum cleaning...For picking, holding, automation...Deep vacuum for laboratories, manufacturing of microchips, plating...

Energy needs for different vacuum levels

Boyle’s Law: the pressure (p) in a gas is inversely proportional to its volume (V) at constant temperature

Boyle’s Law: the pressure (p) in a gas is inversely proportional to its volume (V) at constant temperature.

The energy required to create vacuum increases asymptotically towards infinity with increased vacuum. To obtain optimum energy exchange it is very important to choose the least possible vacuum. To illustrate the energy needs, a cylinder with a piston (piston pump) is suitable.

According to Boyle’s Law the pressure (p) in a gas is inversely proportional to its volume (V) at constant temperature: P1 x V1 = P2 x V2
This means that increased volume gives a lower pressure.

By pulling the piston slowly, the distance extended will show the increased energy needs. The temperature is not constant in practice. However, at a slow operation the temperature effect is negligible.

Energy requirement at increased vacuum

a) Pressure below atmospheric -kPa
b) Energy factor

The diagram illustrates the energy requirement at increased vacuum. As can be seen, the energy requirement increases drastically above 90 -kPa, which is why a vacuum level below this is always advisable.

By never using more energy than absolutely necessary, companies can reduce their carbon footprint as well as their costs.

Your vacuum carbon footprint

Your pump will require less compressed air when it is placed close to the point of suction, thus reducing CO2-emissions and energy consumption.

The graph below demonstrates the relationship between environmental impact and the distance of the pump from the point of suction.

academy_energy_footprint